Most awake
city

Americans drink billions of gallons of coffee every year, and visiting a coffee shop is an essential daily ritual for millions of people.

Without coffee shops providing that burst of energy and alertness in a cup, America would be a much sleepier place.

So we analyzed every single state in the US to discover – where is America’s most awake city?

San Francisco is America’s most awake city

The city has the highest concentration of coffee shops compared to population

San Francisco has the highest ratio of coffee shops to people, with 528 dedicated coffee outlets serving a population of 866,606. 

Seattle maintains its reputation as one of the country’s coffee capitals, placing fourth on the list with a coffee shop for every 1,924 residents, thanks to a population of 769,714 and 400 shops.

Los Angeles boasts the most coffee shops in the study, with 727 in total, but its population of 3,970,219 means that it places lower down the list in 37th, with 5,461 people per coffee shop.

Seattle was home of the original Starbucks, which was first opened in the city in 1971

Top three cities

#1
1,641
people per
coffee shop

San Francisco

San Francisco has one coffee shop for every 1,641 people in the city – the highest ratio out of America’s 100 most populated cities.

#2
1,784
people per
coffee shop

Portland

Portland in Oregon is second on the list, thanks to its 368 coffee shops and a population of 656,751, which means there is a business selling coffee for every 1,784 people in the city.

#3
1,836
people per
coffee shop

Honolulu

Honolulu in Hawaii placed third, with 186 coffee shops and 341,555 people, which is equivalent to a coffee shop for every 1,836 people.

People per
coffee shop
in the biggest
US cities

Use the tables below to discover how awake major American cities are, and how popular coffee shops are in each state.

Use the tables below to discover how awake major American cities are, and how popular coffee shops are in each state.

RankCityPeople per coffee shop
1San Francisco, CA1641
2Portland, OR1785
3Honolulu, HI1836
4Seattle, WA1924
5Orlando, FL1996
6Miami, FL2323
7Pittsburgh, PA2338
8New Orleans, LA2579
9Anchorage, AK2658
10Atlanta, GA2684
11Tampa, FL2699
12Las Vegas, NV2704
13Oakland, CA2759
14San Diego, CA3113
15Sacramento, CA3330
RankStatePeople per coffee shop
1Hawaii2559
2Alaska2701
3Oregon2983
4Washington3000
5New Hampshire3222
6Vermont3441
7Maine3522
8Rhode Island3584
9Montana3877
10Massachusetts3891
11New Jersey3902
12Wyoming4127
13California4270
14Colorado4471
15Connecticut4658
16Idaho4941
17New York4976
18Utah5595
19Pennsylvania5669
20Michigan5725
21New Mexico5757
22Wisconsin5790
23Delaware5862
24Illinois5979
25Nevada6021
26Maryland6172
27North Dakota6179
28Minnesota6193
29Kansas6221
30Iowa6237
31Arizona6398
32Florida6428
33Ohio6582
34Virginia6593
35Missouri6609
36Oklahoma6918
37Nebraska7041
38Indiana7111
39South Dakota7231
40North Carolina7307
41Tennessee7581
42Texas7774
43West Virginia7817
44Arkansas7869
45Louisiana7925
46South Carolina8122
47Kentucky8527
48Georgia8752
49Alabama8952
50Mississippi9320

Most Awake States

Hawaii tops the list as the state with the highest number of coffee shops compared to population.
Hawaii has 555 coffee shops for a population of 1,420,491, which means there is a shop for every 2,559 people.

Alaska is the second most awake state, with 2,701 people per coffee shop.

Oregon is third - 4,190,713 live in the state, and are served by 1,405 coffee shops.

At the other end of the scale, Mississippi’s population of 2,963,914 is served by 318 coffee shops, meaning it has 9,320 people for each coffee shop – the largest ratio of all 50 states.

Alabama places 49th in the list of Most Awake States, with 8,952 people per coffee shop thanks to 4,887,871 residents and 546 shops.

There are 8,752 people per coffee shop in Georgia, making it 48th on the list.

Ask The Experts

Michele Roberge, RPSGT, R.T.
Sleep Disorder Treatment
Michele Roberge is a Registered Polysomnographic Technologist and a Registered Radiologic Technologist. Michele currently leads a 4-bed, hospital-based sleep disorder center in Florida, which is also home to one of the largest sleep apnea support groups in the nation.

Coffee is often used to compensate for a bad night’s sleep – what can we do to sleep better?

Better sleep can often be achieved by adjusting a few habits or practicing good “sleep hygiene”. Maintaining a consistent sleep schedule every day is key to keeping our circadian cycle in balance. The bedroom should be free of light, noise and clutter. If a nightlight is necessary, avoid white/blue/green lights and be sure to have the light out of the direct line of vision. Watching TV at night prevents the brain from entering deep restorative sleep. The sounds and the lights are constantly triggering the brain which interrupts the deep slow wave sleep the body needs. A few other useful tips are to avoid spicy food, caffeine, and napping late in the day. 

Can decaf coffee help give us the same boost of energy, even without the caffeine? And would it minimize the negative impacts of coffee on sleep?

The boost of energy that is felt after drinking coffee is a direct result of the caffeine in the coffee. Therefore, decaf coffee would not give the same effect as traditional caffeinated coffee. Some believe that there is a psychosomatic response when drinking decaffeinated coffee, much like a placebo effect; the person consuming the decaf coffee thinks it will help keep them awake, therefore it does.  

How can we enjoy coffee during the day, but still ensure we get a good night’s sleep?

Drinking coffee during the day is sometimes more of a habit for people rather than a necessity. If the switch can be made to decaffeinated coffee, it could be enjoyed all throughout the day with no effects on sleep. If the switch to decaf is not an option then coffee should not be consumed after noon so the body has time to process the caffeine before it is time for bed. 

How much is too much coffee when trying to optimize your sleep?

An average cup of coffee contains approximately 100mg of caffeine. A person should not consume more than 400mg of caffeine each day. Consuming less than 4 cups of coffee each day should be within the acceptable range. It’s important to note that caffeine can take up to 10 hours to completely metabolize from the bloodstream. Cessation of coffee/caffeine consumption should be at least 8-10 hours prior to bedtime to ensure there is no effect on sleep.

READ MORE+
Katharine Simon, PhD
Postdoctoral Researcher, University of California, Irvine
Dr. Katharine Simon is a Sleep, Memory, Health & Development Researcher and Licensed Clinical Psychologist. She is a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of California Irvine's Sleep and Cognition Lab.

Coffee is often used to compensate for a bad night’s sleep – what can we do to sleep better?

The best way to support your sleep and health are to follow a few simple sleep hygiene guidelines: 

1) Keep a consistent bedtime and waketime. By keeping a similar pattern each day (weekends too!), you can support your body’s natural cycles, called the circadian rhythm. The circadian rhythm is what facilitates your body being awake and energized in the morning and tired and ready to sleep at night. If your schedule is variable, your body may have a harder time being awake in the morning and falling asleep quickly at night. 

2) Turn off electronics and dim the lights about 30 minutes before you plan to sleep. By minimizing light, you are promoting your body’s ability to produce melatonin, which is a hormone that tells your body it is time to fall asleep. 

3) Stop caffeine around 3 pm. Caffeine is known to harm your sleep, making it more difficult to fall asleep and stay asleep. Reducing your caffeine intake and minimizing afternoon surges will support your nighttime rest.

You can find more sleep hygiene guidelines but these are the big 3 that can help you sleep.

 

Can decaf coffee help give us the same boost of energy, even without the caffeine? And would it minimize the negative impacts of coffee on sleep?

Decaf coffee is an excellent alternative for those who feel caffeine is disrupting their sleep. Decaf coffee is known to have a small amount of caffeine; however, it is not enough to alter your circadian rhythm and affect your sleep. Thus a switch to decaf will reduce the negative impacts of caffeinated coffee, hopefully increasing the ease of falling asleep. Although drinking decaf coffee itself is unlikely to give you a boost of energy, the ritual around drinking coffee in the morning paired with improved sleep quality could support more intrinsic energy throughout your day. 

 

How can we enjoy coffee during the day, but still ensure we get a good night’s sleep?

The best way to ensure that you are able to enjoy your coffee and still get a good night’s sleep is to drink it in the morning and to not overindulge. Paired with the above sleep hygiene guidelines and your sleep should be safe. If, however, you notice that you are having a difficult time falling asleep, experiment with the timing and amount of coffee you drink to find the right balance for you. 

 

How much is too much coffee when trying to optimize your sleep?

At some point or another, everyone has experienced the caffeine-induced jitters. That is a clear sign that you are drinking too much coffee. Yet to find the right amount for you involves monitoring your body’s cues. Questions to ask yourself when experimenting can include: can I fall asleep at night easily? When was my last cup of coffee and if I move it earlier, do I still have these same sleep issues? If I cut coffee out, how much does my sleep improve? As always, if you are struggling with sleep issues and coffee does not appear to be the sole culprit keeping you awake, reach out to a sleep professional for support. 

READ MORE+
Colleen Ehrnstrom, Ph.D., ABPP
Licensed Clinical Psychologist at University of Colorado Boulder
Colleen Ehrnstrom is a licensed clinical psychologist. She completed board certified in behavioral and cognitive therapy in 2013, and has been practicing Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) since 2000. Areas of expertise include insomnia, anxiety, depression, sports psychology and optimal mental health.

Coffee is often used to compensate for a bad night’s sleep – what can we do to sleep better?

We are naturally driven to try and compensate when we feel tired from a bad night’s sleep. However, we are also wired to tolerate this discomfort. You might want coffee after a rough night of little sleep but you don’t need it. Instead, embrace the suck. Practice breathing through the discomfort. Go for a walk. Write down your distressing thoughts. Do some light exercise. Trust that you can handle the discomfort. It will lead to better sleep overall.

 

Can decaf coffee help give us the same boost of energy, even without the caffeine? And would it minimize the negative impacts of coffee on sleep?

Decaf coffee cannot provide the same boost of caffeine as caffeinated coffee but it does have the capacity to deliver a different type of energy. This is due to the associations we make to the caffeinated version. If you feel excited or rejuvenated when you head to your favorite coffee shop, this is a form of energy that you will get, regardless of the type of drink you order. If you can order decaf coffee and enjoy it, you will most definitely be minimizing the negative impacts of coffee on your sleep. You will also not miss out on all the other rewards of the coffee experience. If you find yourself struggling to choose decaf, remind yourself of all the other ways this experience gives you energy (e.g., out of the office, walking to the coffee shop, seeing your favorite workers, listening to the conversation, etc).

 

How can we enjoy coffee during the day, but still ensure we get a good night’s sleep?

Change your relationship with each and every moment of your coffee experience. Use mindfulness skills to slow down and treasure the aroma, the temperature, the taste. Intentionally make one cup of coffee last as long as it used to take to drink two cups of coffee. This will allow you to have more pleasurable time with your coffee but with less caffeine. It will also give you an opportunity to hone your mindfulness skills, which have also been shown to be a game changer for challenges with sleep.

 

How much is too much coffee when trying to optimize your sleep?

Too much coffee will make you feel jumpy, irritable, restless, and fidgety. You don’t need to wait until you feel these sensations to cut back. If you aren’t sure, it’s time to experiment. It is most important to taper your coffee intake slowly. Our bodies don’t like drastic changes – it often causes so much initial discomfort we give up before making any substantial gains. An example of a small step: order your regular size and then toss out a bit of the coffee. An example of a medium step: order 12 ounces instead of 16 ounces. The adage is true: slow and steady wins the race.

 

Some final thoughts: 

Though the caffeine in coffee can interfere with sleep, taking coffee out of your life will not instantly fix your sleep. If you have been struggling with troubles falling asleep, staying asleep, waking too early, or not feeling rested during the day, you will want to consider a sleep program known as CBT-I. For more information about how to incorporate CBT-I into your life, we recommend Dr. Colleen Ehrnstrom’s book “End the Insomnia Struggle” as it provides everything you need to optimize your relationship with sleep.

READ MORE+
Kristin Koskinen, RDN, LD, CD
Registered Dietitian Nutritionist
Kristin Koskinen, RDN, LDN, LD, CD specializes in nutrition counseling and medical nutrition therapy with a focus on integrative and functional nutrition. She is a frequent contributor to Shape, Livestrong, Muscle & Fitness, Runner’s World, Eat This!, Popsugar, Parents, Martha Stewart, Oprah, Healthline, Forbes, NBC, and Today.com.

Coffee is often used to compensate for a bad night’s sleep – what can we do to sleep better?

Sleep is essential for good health and though coffee may give you a boost, it can’t compensate for lost sleep. To improve sleep, you can start with your sleep environment. Make sure your room is dark and cool. Black out curtains can keep out light from the sun, moon, or street lights. Blue light from screens suppresses the hormone melatonin which is important for sleep, so ideally cut off screen time a couple hours before bed. If that’s not feasible, aim to turn off screens (TV, computers, phone, tablets, etc.) at least 30 minutes before getting into bed. A cool room supports sleep, too. I recommend 68-70 degrees Fahrenheit. Other strategies include making sure you’re getting enough magnesium in your diet and including foods like tart cherries which have been found to help with sleep.

 

Can decaf coffee help give us the same boost of energy, even without the caffeine? And would it minimize the negative impacts of coffee on sleep?

The boost coffee gives to energy is largely due to the caffeine. In fact, caffeine is used as an ergogenic aid by many athletes to enhance training and performance. Decaffeinated coffee isn’t void of caffeine and usually contains between 2mg and 15mg per 8 ounce cup compared to regular coffee which typically has between 95mg and 200mg per cup. If you’re particularly sensitive to caffeine, you may notice the effects even from decaf. Looking at coffee from a different angle, it’s a source of fluid. Hydration can impact energy levels and so drinking decaf could bump your energy levels because of the extra water intake in addition to the small amount of caffeine, but it won’t be to the same extent as an equal amount of regular coffee.

Since caffeine can disrupt sleep, choosing decaf can minimize the negative impacts it has on sleep. Keep in mind that if your decaf leans toward the upper end of caffeine content and if you drink it too late in the day or in too great a quantity, you may miss out on the improved sleep benefits you may have expected.

 

How can we enjoy coffee during the day, but still ensure we get a good night’s sleep?

I recommend cutting off consumption of regular coffee by noon to make sure it’s cleared your system before bed time. It’s important to note that different people will metabolize caffeine at different rates, but on average, caffeine has a half-life of five hours. That means if you drink 200mg of caffeine at 8:00 am, you’ll still have 100 mg in your system at 1:00 pm, assuming your body breaks down caffeine at the average rate it would be around 6:00 pm before you cleared your system of caffeine. The later in the day you drink your coffee, the more negative the impact will be on your sleep.

 

How much is too much coffee when trying to optimize your sleep?

How much coffee is too much will depend on the amount of caffeine in your coffee. Generally speaking, I recommend people keep their total intake to 400mg or less and if you’re working on sleep hygiene, keep it to 200 mg or less. As a rule, that would be one or two 8 ounce cups. Most of us don’t know how much caffeine is in our favorite cup of Joe, but lighter roasts often have more caffeine than darker roasts. If your coffee habit is more about the experience and the flavor, consider opting for decaf brews after your first cup to minimize your caffeine intake while still enjoying your coffee habit.

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Research Methodology

The study utilized the Yelp API to collate data on the number of coffee shops in more than 10,000 cities and towns across the US.

Once the data was aqcuired, cleaned and double checked, it was cross-referenced with the latest population figures for each town and city.

The comparison of the number of people living in each place with the number of coffee shops would reveal where in America has the highest ratio of coffee shops to people, making it “the most awake city in the US”.

Disclaimer: This article and research is for informational purposes and should not replace advice from your doctor or other medical professional.